What is a TaMaarta Physique Competition?

What is a TaMaarta Physique Competition?
We get this question often.

Is it a bodybuilding show? No.
Of course there are some similarities in stage presentation. But bodybuilding’s innate focus is on building big muscles and getting shredded (super lean). That’s not the goal of TaMaarta which has a focus of what’s called Physique Sculpting.

Physique Sculpting- The art of transforming the body and mind through proper balanced nutrition, wholistic functional body exertion, drug free supplementation, and a positive, deliberate mental focus.

So is it more like CrossFit? No.
Again, there are some similarities. But where CrossFit incorporates many Olympic styled lifts. TaMaarta focuses more on core, bodyweight, basic lifts and reps against time to build endurance and strength.

So What is a TaMaarta Physique Competition?
The answer is simple. It’s a test of strength/endurance combined with a physique showcase/presentation on a stage. A TaMaarta Athlete doesn’t just look strong, they are strong.

The competition has two Phases.
Phase One is a ten exercise circuit.
Phase Two is a stage presentation.

Primary Divisions
Women’s Sculpting (figure)
Women’s Swimwear (bikini)
Women’s Fitness Model
Men’s Sculpting
Men’s Athletic
Young Adult Athletic (15-17)
Juniors Athletic (11-14)

Secondary Divisions
Figure
Bikini
Classic Physique
Physique
Diva Model

During Phase One
IN THIS PHASE OF THE COMPETITION, TWO COMPETITORS WILL GO HEAD TO HEAD TO COMPLETE AS MANY REPETITIONS OF A CHOSEN TAMAARTA 10 EXERCISE AS POSSIBLE WITHIN 60 SECONDS. A COMPETITOR’S SCORE FOR THIS ROUND WILL BE THE NUMBER OF REPS HE OR SHE IS ABLE TO ACHIEVE WITHIN THE ALLOTTED TIME. THE COMPETITOR ACHIEVING THE MOST REPS IN THIS HEAD TO HEAD ROUND WILL EARN 1 ADDITIONAL POINT TO BE USED IN THE CASE A TIE BREAKER IS REQUIRED LATER IN THE COMPETITION.

During Phase Two
THE SECOND PHASE OF EACH COMPETITION IS STAGE PRESENTATION. COMPETITORS WILL FIRST PARTAKE IN A COMPARISON ROUND DURING WHICH PARTICIPANTS WILL WALK ON STAGE IN A GROUP AND PERFORM THE MANDATORY POSES AS DIRECTED BY AN OFFICIAL. COMPETITORS WILL THEN PERFORM AN INDIVIDUAL WALK, WHEREIN EACH WILL HAVE 60 SECONDS TO WALK THE STAGE ALONE, DOING VARIOUS POSES OF HIS OR HER CHOICE, SHOWCASING PERSONALITY, POISE, AND PHYSIQUE.

For Primary Divisions, scores from each phase are combined to you your overall score. Highest score wins.
For Secondary Divisions, score from Phase Two only determines class winners.

To Learn More about the Judging and Attire.

Goals Are Not Just For Kids

Our childhood is one personal goal after another. We begin to ask our children when they are toddlers, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” From the first steps, to first recital, athletic accomplishments, graduation, first job and the grand finale, ADULTHOOD. We have finally arrived. After setting and achieving all those goals, we finally get the big prize and then complacency sets in. Goal setting has been reduced to surviving the daily grind. We may have objectives in the workplace, our personal lives, or maybe a hobby, but these tend to lack the same degree of fulfillment from our childhood achievements. As adults, we lack the idealism of reaching a new potential. However, t does not have to be that way.

As an adult my little sister hired a running coach, which I thought was excessive. Why would someone in their mid twenties hire a running coach!? She had never been a runner before and was not generally into sports. She saw this as a worthy expenditure because she recognized the importance of investing in herself. It ended up being the start of many races to come beginning with the infamous “Beat The Bridge” in Seattle, a competitive 5 miles against time. She had discovered a new pursuit in adulthood that brought her that same aspiration she had in adolescence. I became envious of her drive to create a lifestyle change out of her goal.

It was one goal that started my transformation from thirty pounds overweight to fitness competitions. When I started down this venture, I thought competing would be a one time event that would catapult my weight loss. After achieving a physique that I only thought possible for fitness models, I knew I was experiencing a lifestyle change. I had a eureka moment…Goals are the building blocks that make the permanent changes in our lives. Without setting a goal, I wouldn’t have been held accountable to transform my body, continue going to the gym, and maintain healthy eating habits. I was determined to not go back to my old routine of beer, cookies and excuses.

The journey of childhood is achieving one benchmark after another. The affluence of goals is how we reached adulthood. It is easy to forget this journey is key to life’s enjoyment. As adults, we don’t have to give that up! Setting personal goals is not only exciting but gives the long term satisfaction unlike life’s quick fixes. I use weight loss as an example because I speak from experience; flash diets and gimmicks rarely produce lasting results. We try a different diet every few weeks only to be disappointed because other than fat loss, there is no other goal in place. To begin my transformation, I had to set a goal that would hold me accountable: standing on stage in a bikini. I stopped eating sugar, ordered a pair of glitzy 5” heels, and the hard work began.

Throughout youth, we sought challenges to bring us closer to maturity but also because it was fun. Our mentors provided support and reassurance, making goals feel attainable. But as adults, it’s rare to find that type of support and we become doubtful, modest or even scared. We believe that audacious goals are only for children. Well, I challenge you to set a personal goal. It does not have to be colossal or trophy worthy but something that will result in a positive lifestyle change. We are no longer children but that does not mean we have to stop growing.

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Why I Hate The “Cheat Meal”

The “Cheat Meal” is often a term used when someone dieting rewards themselves with the occasional indulgent meal. The word “cheat”, by definition, means to act dishonestly or unfairly to gain an advantage. Usually the feelings around the “cheat meal” begin with excitement and anticipation and end sadly with guilt and dissatisfaction. Food should not be referred to as something dishonest or shameful but should be transparent and celebratory.

I love food. I am an athlete, bikini competitor, and body builder; and therefore thought I would have to break up with my second love, (my first being my family) food. I was warned by fellow athletes that I would have to give up all my favorite foods and then only “cheat” once in a while. Honestly, the thought of this delayed my training….for seven years. Now I have to add that I am also a Nutritionist and thought that there must be a way to enjoy my favorite foods, have a healthy relationship with food, and STILL meet my body building goals on a competitive level. HALLELUJAH, I have found a way!!

I STOPPED having cheat meals.

I recognized this self defeating cycle of dieting hard and then celebrating with my favorite foods one meal out of the week. I would wait with anticipation and excitement (just like Christmas morning) for my four slices of meat lovers pizza, lots of beer, and a bowl of ice cream. It was glorious! Then I would weigh myself the following morning with this gut wrenching feeling. I would loathe myself for the three pounds I had gained and start the week all over again…playing catch up. I do believe the cheat meal is why leaning out can be so emotional and physically painful. I decided, as a nutritionist and food lover, I had to find another way.

I pronounced that I would eat what I wanted in moderation to fit my dietary needs. EUREKA!

What an original idea! The problem with “The Diet” is the mentality that it is an all or nothing life style. We have been taught to look at all calories as equal and they are not. We have put “cheat foods” on this pedestal and treat healthy foods as something to just sustain life. There must be a way that I can truly enjoy foods on the healthier spectrum and not feel guilty when I did consume foods on the opposite side of that spectrum. This would involve the reversal of some hard wiring. I would have to learn how to approach food choices in a whole new way.

Every snack and meal should be consumed with the question, “What is this choice doing FOR my body?” If the answer is obvious then consume happily and stop when full. If you can’t answer that question then consume consciously, enjoy the indulgence and move on to your next healthy choice. I truly live by this method and to make it work you have to be honest with yourself.

I am eight weeks out from my next bikini competition. In the past, my diet would have normally looked very different then it currently does. I would be constantly living on the edge of hunger, planning out my next cheat meal, and then holding myself in contempt for any weight gain. It has been a long life journey to come to this place of food appreciation. To truly respect all food, I stopped over indulging in unhealthy food choices, living guilt free when enjoying food, and appreciating what healthy foods are doing for my body. This diet approach, that you can “have your cake and eat it too”, can be difficult to accept and practice because there are no objective guidelines. This mentality takes practice and discipline but I promise that you will not only have a new respect for food, but for yourself.

Vegan Chickpea and Carrot Masala

I am not Vegan but appreciate all good tasting food. Being a body builder I get my fill of animal protein. I enjoy the change (also break for my kidneys and liver) of beans and rice that make this tasty meal and a complete protein!  This was very easy and my family of five (including my three little kiddos) devoured this dish!

I just want to add that I very seldom measure things. Please feel comfortable to eye ball ingredients, add your own favorite seasonings or even omit ingredients that you don’t have on hand. This is a relatively forgiving recipe. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • A pot of cooked Basmati rice
  • 1 tablespoon (or so) coconut oil or olive oil
  • 1 onion roughly chopped
  • 2 or 3 carrots roughly chopped
  • 1 red or orange bell pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic (about 5 cloves)
  • 1½ teaspoons of cumin
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger (I use my micro plane. you can also use 1/2 tsp of dried ginger)
  • 1½ teaspoons garam masala
  • 1½ teaspoons ground coriander
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • pink sea salt to taste (or any salt)
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) of diced tomatoes, with their juices
  • 2 cans (14.5 oz each) chickpeas drained

Put onion in a food processor and chop until small enough for your preference. Add carrots, peppers and garlic to food processor, with onion, and chop until you have bite size pieces. Heat your oil in a large pot over medium heat and add the vegetables from food processor. Saute for 5 minutes. Add all the spices from cumin to turmeric. Saute for another 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and chickpeas. Bring to a light boil and then lower heat to a simmer with lid on. Simmer for about 20 minutes stirring occasionally. Take lid off and season with salt and cayenne as desired. Simmer for another 10 minutes. Serve hot over Basmati rice.